WHAT TO DO IF YOU THINK YOUR DOG HAS BLOAT

 

When it comes to diseases in dogs you should be aware of Bloat it is high on the list- the 2nd largest killer in large breeds after cancer- in humans it is fairly harmless in a dog its a killer. Treatment for Bloat is needed very quickly.

Bloat is also known as Gastric dilatation volvulus (GDV), It's a condition when the stomach twists and fills up with gas, or the other way round no one is actually sure how it occurs. Regardless of how it happens it is serious, the stomach becomes distended with gas and puts pressure on the diaphragm, which can cause breathing problems, additionally it the cuts off the return blood flow to the heart, the extreme pressure can cause tissue to die off with the stomach rupturing, sometimes the spleen is also twisted with the stomach, although professionals have a lot of knowledge of Bloat there is a huge missing area- why Bloat happens.........

WHAT ARE THE SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS:

Outwardly Bloat could look like a swollen stomach, with lots of drooling and panting and walking around, sometimes they will make noises to let you know they are in pain. Also be aware if they are trying to vomit with nothing happening.

IF YOU SEE ANY OF THESE SIGNS PLEASE TAKE YOUR DOG TO THE VETS IMMEDIATELY .........

WHAT SHOULD YOU DO IF YOU SUSPECT YOUR DOG HAS BLOAT? 

If you suspect your dog has bloat there is only one thing to do, get them to the vets straight away, there is NOTHING you can do for them at home !!!! It is a life-threatening emergency and cannot wait til the morning !! If you are not sure ring your vets and get advice, usually they will tell you to bring your dog in so it can be ruled out.

Once you are at the vets x-rays and blood work will be done and bloat is diagnosed, surgery is the only treatment. They go into the abdomen and untwist the stomach, the stomach is then sewn to the body wall to prevent it from twisting again this is called gastropexy. If the spleen has also twisted they will remove this. Sometimes if severe enough part of the stomach will be removed.

Sometimes despite surgery dogs can still die, up to a 3rd after surgery. The longer they are bloated the poorer the prognosis, so please do not delay.......

AFTER SURGERY..

Keep your dog calm and let them rest, give them pain medication and antibiotics (finish the course) and do not let them gnaw at the wound (dreaded lampshade to be used).This could be for a few weeks.

CAN BLOAT BE PREVENTED?

In at risk dogs (normally large breeds although any breed can suffer with it) there is an operation that can prevent it it's called prophylactic gastropexy, although there is a risk for any dog going under anaesthesia it is highly recommended by vets

The following are also recommended as prevention instead of surgery

  • Feeding several small meals each day
  • Not feeding from an elevated food bowl
  • Avoiding dry kibble
  • Offering water at all times
  • Trying to reduce stress, especially around feeding time

Although the second one is quite controversial as some say elevated some say no.................

 

0
0
0
s2smodern

DOG FIRST AID KIT

Your dog first aid kit should include:

  • bandages – a roll of self-adhesive or crepe bandage (5cm width)
  • conforming/open-weave bandages (2.5cm width)
  • some non-adhesive absorbent dressings (5cm x 5cm) to cover open wounds
  • surgical sticky tape
  • a box of cotton wool
  • a box of sterile absorbent gauze
  • blunt ended scissors, preferably curved
  • a thick towel
0
0
0
s2smodern

HOW TO HANDLE YOUR DOG'S WASP OR BEE STING

Dogs are curious. They love to run and chase things including insects, which in some cases protect themselves by stinging the dog.

HornetMultiple stings are dangerous. Most of the time, an insect sting is just painful and irritating for your dog. Getting stung several times, or stung inside the mouth or throat, is dangerous and requires a trip to the veterinarian.

Bee and wasp stings are poisons. The two most common types of stinging insects are bees and wasps. It’s not the small puncture wound that causes the sting's pain, but the small amount of poison that is injected.

  • A bee’s stinger is barbed and designed to lodge in the skin, killing the bee when the stinger detaches from the body
  • Wasp stingers are not barbed but are more painful, and if provoked these insects can sting multiple times

Most of the time dogs get stung on their faces from investigating a stinging insect too closely. A sting on your dog’s sensitive nose is particularly painful. Some dogs may even get stung on the tongue or inside their mouth or throat if they try to bite or catch an insect. These stings can be dangerous., The subsequent swelling can close your dog’s throat and block his airway.

Watch for allergic reactions. A severe reaction can be caused by a large number of stings or by an allergic reaction. Signs of a reaction include:

  • General weakness
  • Difficulty breathing
  • A large amount of swelling extending away from the sting site

If your dog is having a severe reaction, you need to take the dog to a vet immediately.

A simple sting can be safely left alone. It should be bothersome only temporarily. If a stinger is still present, try to remove it by scraping it with a fingernail or a rigid piece of cardboard. Avoid using tweezers or forceps to remove it unless absolutely necessary as this may force more venom out of the stinger.

Administer a remedy for the pain. Applying a weak mixture of water and baking soda to the affected area will help reduce the pain. You can also wrap ice or an icepack in a towel and apply it to the wound to reduce swelling and pain.

Maintain a watchful eye on your dog. Observe your dog closely after the sting incident to ensure an allergic reaction doesn’t develop. If several days pass and the swelling doesn't go down, notify your veterinarian.

0
0
0
s2smodern

Page 4 of 4

© 2019 Brooklea Mastiff Rescue. All Rights Reserved.